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Keeping You Safe During Severe Weather




Weather Safety

The severe weather safety guidelines exist because they work most of the time; following these guidelines won't guarantee you won't be hurt or killed, but should improve your chances of being safe. The basiscs of severe weather is simple: Get in, get down, cover up!

Make a Plan

Make a plan today. Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to know which types of disasters could affect your area. Know how you’ll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find. As you prepare your plan tailor your plans and supplies to your specific daily living needs and responsibilities. Discuss your needs and responsibilities and how people in the network can assist each other with communication, care of children, business, pets, or specific needs like the operation of durable medical equipment. Create your own personal network for specific areas where you need assistance. Consider the following:

Different ages of members within your household

Dietary needs

Medical needs including prescriptions and equipment

Disabilities or access and functional needs including devices and equipment

Pets or service animals

Households with school-aged children


Be Informed

Know what disasters could affect your area, how to get emergency alerts, and where you would go if you and your family need to evacuate. Public safety officials use timely and reliable systems to alert you and your family in the event of natural or man-made disasters. These alerts include Wireless Emergency Alerts on Cell Phones, Emergency Alert System on TV and Radio, NOAA Weather Radio, and online.


Lightning

It is essential that people in charge of organized outdoor activities understand the dangers of lightning and have a lightning safety plan. Don’t be afraid to ask. If you hear thunder, it’s time to get to a safe building or vehicle. No place outside is safe when a thunderstorm is in the area. Get inside as soon as you hear thunder. Run to a substantial building or hard-topped metal vehicle as fast as you can.


Severe Weather

Continue to listen to local news or a NOAA Weather Radio to stay updated about severe thunderstorm watches and warnings. Go inside a sturdy building immediately if severe thunderstorms are approaching. Sheds and storage facilities are not safe. Taking shelter under a tree can be deadly. Go to your secure location if you hear a severe thunderstorm warning. Damaging wind or large hail may be approaching. Take your pets with you if time allows. Stay away from windows if you are in a severe thunderstorm warning and damaging wind or large hail is approaching. Do not go to large open rooms such as cafeterias, gymnasiums or auditoriums. Being in a vehicle during severe thunderstorms is safer than being outside; however, drive to closest secure shelter if there is sufficient time.


Tornados

Continue to listen to local news or a NOAA Weather Radio to stay updated about tornado watches and warnings. If you are in a tornado warning, go to your basement, safe room, or an interior room away from windows. Don't forget pets if time allows. Being in a vehicle during a tornado is not safe. The best course of action is to drive to the closest shelter. If you are unable to make it to a safe shelter, either get down in your car and cover your head, or abandon your car and seek shelter in a low lying area such as a ditch or ravine.


Floods

During a flood, water levels and the rate the water is flowing can quickly change. Remain aware and monitor local radio and television outlets. Avoid flood waters at all costs and evacuate immediately when water starts to rise. Don't wait until it's too late! Find higher ground and always obey evacuation orders.


Heat Waves

North American summers are hot. Sometimes spring and fall temperatures reach dangerous levels as well. Most summers see heat waves in one or more parts of the United States. Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year and even more heat-related illnesses. Slow down: reduce, eliminate or reschedule strenuous activities until the coolest time of the day. Children, seniors and anyone with health problems should stay in the coolest available place, not necessarily indoors. Check on older, sick, or frail people who may need help responding to the heat. Each year, dozens of children and untold numbers of pets left in parked vehicles die from hyperthermia. Keep your children, disabled adults, and pets safe during tumultuous heat waves. Drink plenty of water (not very cold), non-alcoholic and decaffeinated fluids, even if you don't feel thirsty. If you on a fluid restrictive diet or have a problem with fluid retention, consult a physician before increasing consumption of fluids.



These summary of weather safety tips and recomendations are sumarrized from the National Weather Service. East Cobb Weather does not guarantee the accuracy of the information and is only listed as a courtsey to our viewers. Please visit the National Weather Service website or contact your local forecast office for updated safety tips. The user assumes all responsibility and entire risk related to the use of this information.